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  #1  
Old 02-25-2016, 08:35 AM
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Default HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

(From Chef John Folse)


1. In order to start the process, wash, rinse and thoroughly dry the new skillet or dutch oven to remove the protective wax coating. I recommend drying the utensil over a low flame to remove all moisture from the porous metal, 2-3 minutes.
2. Put two tablespoons of liquid vegetable oil in the utensil. Do not use saturated fat, such as butter or bacon fat, because this fat will become rancid during storage. Use a paper towel to coat the entire surface of the utensil with the oil, inside and out — including all corners, edges and lids.
3. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F for 30 minutes. Line a large baking pan or cookie sheet with aluminum foil and turn the utensils upside down, including the lid, to prevent the oil building up on the inside of the pan.
4. Bake the utensils for 1 hour, turn off the heat and allow the skillet or dutch oven to cool completely in the oven with the door closed, 4-6 hours.
5. Remove from oven and wipe with a paper towel. This completes the seasoning process, and you are ready to use your nicely seasoned cast iron skillet.
GENERAL CARE
In addition to seasoning, the general care of cast iron is also important. By following these easy steps, you can ensure your cast iron pieces will be around to serve you for a long time to come.
1. Always wash with a mild detergent, rinse and dry thoroughly. I recommend placing a thoroughly rinsed utensil over heat or flame, 2-3 minutes, to remove any moisture from the porous metal. Never scour or use a dishwasher. (You may use a plastic bun to remove stubborn food particles).
2. Cook food with little water content the first few times. Avoid cooking acidic foods such as tomatoes, unless combined with other food. Uncover hot food as you remove from the heat, because steam may remove the protective coating.
3. Rust, a metallic taste or discolored foods are signs of improper or inadequate seasoning. If this occurs, wash thoroughly and re-season.
4. Since cast iron heats evenly, it is not necessary to use extremely high cooking temperatures. Best results are obtained with medium to medium-to-high temperature settings. Do not overheat or leave empty utensil on the burner. Never place the utensil on an already heated burner; rather, allow the utensil to heat as the burner does.
That black finish that good cooks covet will develop over time, providing years of good cooking and creating a new heirloom for future generations.
HOW TO CLEAN AN OLD CAST IRON POT
Extensive use of a cast iron pot will cause a crust to build up on the inside and outside of the pot. No amount of washing will prevent this build-up.
To clean follow this procedure:
* Wash pot as normal.
* Place empty pot in an open fire, fireplace, wood heater or in campfire.
* Allow pot to cook until the residue is burned away.
* HANDLE CAREFULLY – remove from the fire and set aside, allowing slow cooling until the pot is cool enough to hold.
* Use moist sand and cloth to scrub the inside and outside of the pot.
* Season as you would a new pot.
* Your 20-year-old pot will look the same as when it was new. Follow the same general care procedures.
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  #2  
Old 02-25-2016, 11:58 AM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

just cook bacon / sausage / fatty meats in it.

seasoning and sh*t happens, all by itself.

most of the vegetable oils turn into a sticky gummy mess long before they carbonize into a proper coating.
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Old 02-25-2016, 01:21 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

I find frying fish in canola oil freshens a skillet quite nicely.

I've even gone to using PAM to fry bacon.

I'm sure everyone has a trick that works for them.
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Old 02-25-2016, 02:43 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

I hate using veg oil to coat dry cast iron because the oil turns gummy. So now I heat my pans/pots to dry, then use old fashioned blue can solid Crisco to coat hot pot/pans then wipe excess out. No gummy residue.
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Old 07-23-2016, 12:44 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

Interesting read.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/29/di...pany.html?_r=0
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Old 07-23-2016, 12:50 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

I'm liking the chicken thigh and lemon recipe.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/68861692-...pgtype=article
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Old 07-23-2016, 01:44 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilbopeep View Post
I hate using veg oil to coat dry cast iron because the oil turns gummy. So now I heat my pans/pots to dry, then use old fashioned blue can solid Crisco to coat hot pot/pans then wipe excess out. No gummy residue.
I don't know if it's worth reopening a 6 month old thread, but if your seasoning oil turns gummy, the oil is applied too thick or the heat is too low. Polymerized oil will not turn gummy. Because of this, I don't believe that a single application of oil is sufficient. 4-6 very thin coats is much better and a pan so treated will outlast the owner.

Seems to me like there are a lot of errors in the OP. A properly seasoned pan will not rust. Neither will any heat in the cooking range affect it. Keep in mind that you are creating the surface at 500 degrees, well above the smoke point of the oil. The polymerized finish is a very hard plastic. A little scraping doesn't hurt it.

Properly polymerized oil will not turn rancid. Opinions differ on the best oil to use. I use flax seed. It will definitely turn rancid in it's liquid state, but once polymerized it lasts forever. I have several CI pans seasoned 10 years ago and never used, no signs of rancidness, no rust.
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Old 07-23-2016, 02:50 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

seasoning cast iron has never been the same since Martha got out of jail.

I guess the Pony Express was 'invented' to deliver all these exotic oils to settlers.
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Old 07-23-2016, 03:29 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChowderMan View Post
seasoning cast iron has never been the same since Martha got out of jail.

I guess the Pony Express was 'invented' to deliver all these exotic oils to settlers.
I agree on the oil. Go to a cast iron site like Wags (where the experts congregate) and you will find 10 posters with 12 opinions on the best oil.

All the fat needs to do is polymerize at obtainable heats and not be toxic. Nearly all fats will do that.

I've done a few using only pork fat out of the butcher's scrap barrel. Worked just fine.
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Old 07-24-2016, 03:21 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChowderMan View Post
seasoning cast iron has never been the same since Martha got out of jail.

I guess the Pony Express was 'invented' to deliver all these exotic oils to settlers.

To save yourselves all that aggravation & hassle, the cast iron cookware comes pre-seasoned.

You can start using it right out of the box. I like it better that way!
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Old 07-24-2016, 03:34 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shermie View Post
To save yourselves all that aggravation & hassle, the cast iron cookware comes pre-seasoned.

You can start using it right out of the box. I like it better that way!
You can believe that if you want, but new Lodge is nowhere near the surface of well seasoned old CI.
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  #12  
Old 07-24-2016, 04:48 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

It's true.

I've never had any trouble with mine.
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Old 07-15-2017, 05:56 PM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

I got this at a garage sale today - #8 Wagner - and will need a little work to bring it back to life, but not much. The gal said they bought it at a garage sale and used it for tent camping before they got a camping trailer. It's didn't make sense to me but wasn't going to talk her into keeping it. US$10.00
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:43 AM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

I miss mine .... (cracked many years ago)

What a find, Johnny !
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Old 07-16-2017, 09:59 AM
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Default Re: HOW TO SEASON A NEW CAST IRON POT

I'll keep my eye out for another one - lucked into that one. Another lady was wanting it just as I paid for it.
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